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The History of Hot Stamping in the Automotive Industry

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Hot stamping is a manufacturing process used by the automotive industry to create stronger, lighter components which in turn improves the fuel efficiency and safety in vehicles. Hot stamping allows manufacturers to form relatively complex parts in a single-step pattern. The process creates a multi component, near-net-shape part that is stronger than a welded steel part. The reduced weight and increased rigidity of the high-strength steel parts produced using hot stamping makes it an important process for the manufacturing of automobiles.

Safety and fuel economy are always top of mind to consumers, even in times of relatively low gas prices. In fact, according to a survey by Consumer Reports, 53 percent of vehicle owners in the United States say they expect their next car to have better fuel mileage. If a vehicle’s weight is reduced by 10 percent its gas mileage can improve by 6 to 8 percent, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. Due to the consumer demand for better gas mileage, suppliers in the automotive industry have always looked for ways reduce the weight of the vehicles they produce.

Hot Stamping Makes a Mark on Automotive

The Swedish company Plannja developed and patented hot stamping back in 1977 by using the technology primarily for the production of saw blades and lawnmower blades. In 1984, Saab Automotive AB became the first in the automotive industry to use hot stamping when they made a hardened boron steel component for their Saab 9000. In the decades since, more automakers have switched over to hot stamping to improve vehicle weight and fuel efficiency.

The Hot Stamping Process

Alternatively known as hot forming or press hardening, hot stamping is the process of forming metal while it is hot – usually at temperatures exceeding 900 degrees C – and then quenching the piece to rapidly cool the material. Hot stamping converts low-strength metal into a high-strength steel. Hot stamping can be used to create a number of structural automotive components, such as body pillars, roof rails, rockers, bumpers, and door intrusion beams. The hot stamping process helps to ensure these components are strong enough to withstand a large load and light enough to improve gas mileage. The process can also save on the cost to manufacture a part, particularly in the manufacturing of conventional rear frames and other components that require durable and light material.

Lindberg/MPH Hot Stamping Furnaces

Lindberg/MPH manufactures batch and multiple-batch style automotive hot stamping furnaces. These furnaces provide uniform heating for a wide range of high-strength steels or aluminum materials. They can be designed to accommodate a wide range of structural or part shapes and sizes. Lindberg/MPH’s hot stamp furnaces are available with rapid and selective heating areas, data acquisition systems for full process reporting, and hydraulically actuated doors.

For more information on Lindberg/MPH’s Hot Stamping Furnaces, visit our website www.lindbergmph.com or connect with us through our Facebook or LinkedIn pages.

  1. LMPH Blog-Sep19:The History of HotStamping and the Automotive IndustryHot stampingis a manufacturing process used by theautomotive industrytocreate stronger, lightercomponentswhich in turn improves thefuel efficiency andsafety in vehicles.Hotstamping allowsmanufacturers to form relatively complex partsin a single-steppattern. The process creates amulticomponent, near-net-shape part that is stronger than aweldedsteel part.The reduced weightandincreasedrigidity of the high-strength steelparts produced using hot stamping makes it animportantprocessforthe manufacturing of automobiles.Safety and fuel economy are alwaystop of mindto consumers, even in times of relatively low gas prices.In fact,according to a survey byConsumer Reports,53 percent of vehicle owners in the United Statessay they expect their next car to have better fuel mileage.Ifa vehicle’s weightis reducedby 10percentits gas mileage canimprove by 6 to 8 percent, according to theU.S. Department of Energy.Due totheconsumerdemand for better gas mileage,suppliersin the automotive industry have always looked forways reduce the weight of the vehicles they produce.Hot Stamping Makes a Mark on AutomotiveThe Swedish company Plannja developed and patented hot stampingbackin1977byusing thetechnology primarily for the production of saw blades and lawnmower blades. In 1984, Saab AutomotiveAB became the first in the automotive industry to use hot stamping when they made a hardened boronsteel component for their Saab 9000. In the decades since, more automakers have switched over to hotstamping to improve vehicle weight and fuel efficiency.The Hot Stamping ProcessAlternativelyknown as hot forming or press hardening, hot stamping is the process of forming metalwhile it is hotusually at temperatures exceeding 900 degrees Cand then quenching the piecetorapidlycool thematerial. Hot stamping converts low-strength metal intoahigh-strength steel.Hotstampingcan beusedto create a number ofstructural automotive components, such as body pillars,roof rails, rockers, bumpers, and door intrusion beams. The hot stamping processhelps to ensurethesecomponents are strong enough to withstand a large load and light enough to improve gas mileage.Theprocess can alsosave onthecostto manufacture a part, particularly in the manufacturing ofconventional rear frames and other components that require durable and light material.Lindberg/MPH Hot Stamping FurnacesLindberg/MPHmanufactures batch and multiple-batch styleautomotivehot stamping furnaces. Thesefurnacesprovide uniform heating for a wide range of high-strength steels or aluminum materials. Theycan be designed to accommodate a wide range of structural or part shapes and sizes.Lindberg/MPH’shot stamp furnacesare availablewithrapid and selective heating areas, data acquisition systems for fullprocess reporting, andhydraulically actuateddoors.
  1. LMPH Blog-Sep19:The History of HotStamping and the Automotive IndustryHot stampingis a manufacturing process used by theautomotive industrytocreate stronger, lightercomponentswhich in turn improves thefuel efficiency andsafety in vehicles.Hotstamping allowsmanufacturers to form relatively complex partsin a single-steppattern. The process creates amulticomponent, near-net-shape part that is stronger than aweldedsteel part.The reduced weightandincreasedrigidity of the high-strength steelparts produced using hot stamping makes it animportantprocessforthe manufacturing of automobiles.Safety and fuel economy are alwaystop of mindto consumers, even in times of relatively low gas prices.In fact,according to a survey byConsumer Reports,53 percent of vehicle owners in the United Statessay they expect their next car to have better fuel mileage.Ifa vehicle’s weightis reducedby 10percentits gas mileage canimprove by 6 to 8 percent, according to theU.S. Department of Energy.Due totheconsumerdemand for better gas mileage,suppliersin the automotive industry have always looked forways reduce the weight of the vehicles they produce.Hot Stamping Makes a Mark on AutomotiveThe Swedish company Plannja developed and patented hot stampingbackin1977byusing thetechnology primarily for the production of saw blades and lawnmower blades. In 1984, Saab AutomotiveAB became the first in the automotive industry to use hot stamping when they made a hardened boronsteel component for their Saab 9000. In the decades since, more automakers have switched over to hotstamping to improve vehicle weight and fuel efficiency.The Hot Stamping ProcessAlternativelyknown as hot forming or press hardening, hot stamping is the process of forming metalwhile it is hotusually at temperatures exceeding 900 degrees Cand then quenching the piecetorapidlycool thematerial. Hot stamping converts low-strength metal intoahigh-strength steel.Hotstampingcan beusedto create a number ofstructural automotive components, such as body pillars,roof rails, rockers, bumpers, and door intrusion beams. The hot stamping processhelps to ensurethesecomponents are strong enough to withstand a large load and light enough to improve gas mileage.Theprocess can alsosave onthecostto manufacture a part, particularly in the manufacturing ofconventional rear frames and other components that require durable and light material.Lindberg/MPH Hot Stamping FurnacesLindberg/MPHmanufactures batch and multiple-batch styleautomotivehot stamping furnaces. Thesefurnacesprovide uniform heating for a wide range of high-strength steels or aluminum materials. Theycan be designed to accommodate a wide range of structural or part shapes and sizes.Lindberg/MPH’shot stamp furnacesare availablewithrapid and selective heating areas, data acquisition systems for fullprocess reporting, andhydraulically actuateddoors.